Nearly 50 Call-Ups for CHL This Past Season


CHL Celebrates Successful Season in Developing Players

Close to 70 Different CHL Players Called-Up to AHL Over Past Two Seasons

GLENDALE, AZ (May 11, 2012) – The Central Hockey League’s (CHL) 20th Anniversary season came to an end earlier this week and during the milestone season, CHL teams saw 33 different players earn time in the American Hockey League (AHL) accounting for 49 total call-ups and 991 days in the AHL for the players.

martens8231733.jpg
Martens Finished the Year in the AHL

Over the past two seasons, the CHL has had the most call-ups in the history of the league with 36 different players called-up last season and more than 2,500 days in the AHL over the past two seasons.

CLICK HERE to see a complete list of the CHL players called-up to the AHL.

For the second straight season, the Allen Americans (primary CHL affiliate of the Colorado Avalanche) had the most players make the journey to the AHL as 12 players were called-up (a total of 17 different transactions).  CHL All-Star defensemen Dylan King (eight games) and Scott Langdon (seven games) both spent extended time with the Avalanche’s AHL Affiliate, the Lake Erie Monsters.

Wichita defenseman Andrew Martens, the 2011 CHL Most Outstanding Defenseman, was called-up by two different AHL clubs seeing a total of 25 games.  Martens played 13 games with the Toronto Marlies registering two assists and a +3 plus/minus rating and also dressed in 12 games with the Oklahoma City Barons.

Rio Grande Valley forward David Marshall spent 42 games in San Antonio with the Rampage, the AHL affiliate of the Florida Panthers, where he scored five goals with four assists.

In total, nine of the 14 CHL clubs had at least one player earn a call-up to the AHL.




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